PLAYERS  2 to 4

AGES   All chess players

OBJECT
To force the opponent’s King into Checkmate.  Checkmate is accomplished by forcing the opponent’s King into a
position where he can not move.  At that point, any move would result in checkmate.

EQUIPMENT    64 chess pieces total          
                       16 chess pieces each of white, black, maroon and emerald
                       Quad Kingdom Chess board

DESCRIPTION
Standard rules of Chess apply for piece set-up, movement, and capture.  Two additional rows, “Kingdoms”, are
added to each side of a standard chessboard to accommodate the starting positions of the four Kingdoms.  
These Kingdoms may be used by all players to maneuver, capture and checkmate in each Option of play.  Each
Kingdom is flanked to its left and right by “Towers”, which exclude play across diagonally adjacent playing
positions at each indented corner.  Six rows in front of each Kingdom is a line of Pawn Promotion which is marked
by corresponding colored lines with flags at each end.  Once a Pawn has moved to the designated line of Pawn
Promotion, not over, it is promoted to another piece.  The entire board is used for battle.

SET-UP
Each player is allotted 16 chess pieces of a Kingdom.  The board is positioned so the White and Black Kingdoms
have a light colored square on their bottom right.  Maroon and Emerald Kingdoms have a dark colored square on
their bottom right.  White pieces are positioned farthest away from the white line of Pawn Promotion as well as
other corresponding colors from their matching lines of Pawn Promotion.   Maroon pieces are positioned to the left
of the White pieces and Emerald pieces are positioned to the right of the White pieces.  The pieces are positioned
the same as in  standard Chess. The White King is positioned on a dark square and the White Queen stands on a
light square.   The opposing Black King and Queen go directly opposite of the White King and Queen. The Black
King stands on a light square and the Black Queen on a dark square.  The Emerald King is positioned on a dark
square and the Emerald Queen on a light square.  Opposing Maroon King and Queen go directly opposite of the
Emerald King and Queen. The Maroon King stands on a light square and the Maroon Queen on a dark square.

4 PLAYER GAME PLAY
INDIVIDUAL
Standard rules of Chess apply.  Starting clockwise, the White Kingdom moves first, Maroon Kingdom second,
Black Kingdom third and Emerald Kingdom fourth.  The Kingdoms may be used to maneuver, capture or
checkmate within all Options of play.  The indented corners, Towers, may not be used for diagonal travel or
capture. The exception of the rule is the Knight who can maneuver around the Towers.  The Towers may be used
to protect pieces.  Once a player is checkmated, the player is not finished until it is that person's turn.  A player can
never move into check.  A checkmated King, “Turns to Stone” and remains in position on the board.  The
remaining pieces of a checkmated Kingdom loose all power to attack but may be captured or serve as obstacles
or shields for the active pieces.  Play continues until all of the opponent’s Kings are checkmated.
TEAMS
White and Black Kingdoms are one team.  Maroon and Emerald Kingdoms are the opposing team.  Verbal or
written interaction may be used  against the opponent(s).  Checkmating your teammate can not occur, but the
capture of a team member’s piece may be made by your partner to gain a better attacking position.  Once a King is
checkmated, he “Turns to Stone” and remains in position on the board.  The remaining pieces of a checkmated
Kingdom may be captured or serve as obstacles or shields for the active pieces.  The player who is checkmated
may still assist the existing team member  by verbal communication.  The two conquering  Kingdoms combine
getting one move, from either Kingdom, per move of the opposing team member.  Play continues until both Kings
of the opponents are checkmated resulting in a team win.

ALTERNATIVE PLAY
2 PLAYERS
Option A- Two player Quad Kingdom Chess - Option A is played utilizing all 64 pieces.  White and Black Kingdom
pieces are used by one player against an opponent who uses the Maroon and Emerald Kingdom pieces.  White
and Black pieces may capture one another, but not checkmate one another.  The same rule applies for the Maroon
and Emerald pieces.  White plays first, second move occurs by the opponent moving Maroon.  The first player then
moves a Black piece, the opponent then moves Emerald.  Once a Kingdom is in checkmate, those pieces are not
to be used by that player for the remainder of the game.  The checkmated King, “Turns to Stone” and remains in
position for the remainder of the game.  The remaining pieces of a checkmated Kingdom may be captured or
serve as obstacles or shields for the active pieces.  The game continues until both Kings of one player are
checkmated.  
Option B-  Two player Quad Kingdom Chess - Option B is played by utilizing only the White and Black pieces.  Set-
up is the same as 4 PLAYER Quad Kingdom Chess eliminating the Maroon and Emerald pieces.  Standard rules
of Chess apply.      

3 PLAYERS
Three player Quad Kingdom Chess is played utilizing all 64 pieces.  White, Maroon, and Black Kingdom pieces
are used by three players.  Emerald Kingdom pieces are used by all players respectively once they move their
piece and a full rotation of play is accomplished.  White Kingdom moves first, Maroon Kingdom second and Black
Kingdom third.  Once all three players have moved, White has “Control of the Emerald Kingdom” and moves an
Emerald piece.  It remains under the control of the White Kingdom until Maroon and Black Kingdoms move.  Then
Maroon Kingdom takes “Control of the Emerald Kingdom” and moves an Emerald piece only when it is Emerald’s
turn to move. It remains under the control of the Maroon Kingdom until Black Kingdom moves and then Black takes
“Control of the Emerald Kingdom“.  When in “Control of the Emerald Kingdom”, that player can not be under check
by the Emerald pieces.  Emerald pieces can be captured if a player is or is not in “Control of the Emerald
Kingdom."   The Emerald King can not be under check or be checkmated.  Play continues until all the opponent’s
Kings are checkmated.     

POINT SYSTEM
All of the Quad Kingdom Chess games can use a point system.  This point system will determine a winner by the
accumulation of the most points before checkmating or being put into checkmate.  Captured pieces of the same
team do not count for points.  If a player does not have more points than the opponent(s), then a win can not
occur.  If opponent(s) are tied with the most points then a checkmate can occur.  Points can be gathered from a
checkmated Kingdom.  The player who puts the final checkmate on an opponent's King gets the points, but the
King still remains on the board.             

                     Pawn =  1 point                                     Bishop=3 points                                   Queen=9 points
                     Knight= 3 points                                   Rook  = 5 points                                    King= 11 points                     

MOVEMENT OF PIECES
King - The King is the most important piece.  The King can move one square in any direction.  An exception is
castling.  The King may never move into check. The King can move out of check, or use another piece to protect it
from being in check.  When trapped or checkmated, the Kingdom loses.  

Queen - The Queen is the most powerful piece.  The Queen can move any number of squares in any direction -
horizontal, vertical, or diagonal - if her path is not blocked.  

Rook - The Rook is the next most powerful piece.  The Rook can move any number of squares vertically or
horizontally if  the path is not blocked.

Bishop - The Bishop can move any number of squares diagonally if the path is not blocked.  Each player will have
two Bishops, one on a light square and one on a dark square.

Knight - The Knight moves two squares horizontally or vertically and then makes a right angle turn for one more
square.  The Knight may move over or around any piece and is the only piece that can go around the Towers.

Pawn - The Pawn moves one square at a time, but on its first move it has the option of moving forward one or two
squares.  It moves straight ahead (never backward), but it captures by moving forward at a diagonal one square.  If
a pawn advances all the way to its corresponding line of Pawn Promotion, it must be immediately promoted to
another piece, usually a Queen.  It may not remain a Pawn or become a King.  Therefore, it is possible for each
player to have more than one Queen or more than two Rooks, Bishops, or Knights on the board at the same time.

Castling - Each player may “castle” once during a game if certain conditions are met.  Castling is a special move
that lets a player move two pieces at once - the King and the Rook.  In castling, the player moves the King two
squares to its left or right toward one of his Rooks.  At the same time, the Rook involved goes to the square beside
the King and toward the center of the board.  In order to castle, neither the King nor the Rook involved may have
moved before.  Also the King may not castle out of check, into check, or through check.  Further, there may not be
pieces of any color between the King and the Rook involved in castling.  Castling is often a very important move for
it allows the King to move to a safe location and also allows the Rook to become more active.  When the move is
legal, each player has the choice of castling Kingside or Queenside or not at all.